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Pro Apps on the iPad

  • October 16, 2018
  • Blog

Adobe recently announced that Photoshop is coming to the iPad, and with that comes talk of how the iPad is once again on the precipice of gaining the ability to be a “Mac replacement.”

For me, this seems a bit trite and something that isn’t a matter of if or when, the iPad is a Mac replacement if I ever saw one. In fact, I have been using my iPad as a main computer once again since the release of iOS 12. I haven’t picked up my Mac for more than a few minutes a handful of times.

I do still use my Mac, don’t get me wrong, and I think it is an amazing machine. With that said, it isn’t necessary for my workflow of writing, reading RSS feeds, designing minimal graphics, and managing the backend of my websites. All of this can be done on my iPad with ease.

So why did I decide to crack open my Mac? Because when I needed to do something quick, it was easier for me to use a Mac app that I was already familiar with than to try and find a solution on my iPad that would have made this quick thing I had to do an entire project. If I really wanted to go iPad only, those quick and easy things I do on my Mac would become projects and learning sessions on my iPad. It isn’t impossible, but it isn’t something that I can make time for right now.

With all this said, there are times where I will make a conscious effort to make the switch from an app on the Mac to something on my iPad. A recent example of this is going from Adobe Photoshop on my Mac for graphic design to Affinity Designer on the iPad.

The reason for this is two-fold. The first being that I wanted to make more logos and designs with an app that is actually meant for designing rather than using a photo editing tool as a means to making logos. Adobe Illustrator came to mind, but I have had issues with RAM on my Mac when using that app on my Mac. So, I decided to look into other alternatives and Affinity Designer was one that I felt was an obvious leader for the iPad. It had all the features I would want a Pro app to have, tutorials to make my life easier when learning this new system, and an affordable price tag to $19.99.

After downloading the app, I spent an hour or so watching tutorials and just playing around with the application to get a grip on what all this system can use and what things I could look into for my own work. The UI is brilliantly placed and allowed for a busy and cramped space to look like it was crafted specifically for the iPad instead of cramming a desktop version of an app into a smaller screen haphazardly.

The apps Affinity has put together allow for it to be a seamless and simple solutions for people looking for a pro application to edit photos and design works of art, but they aren’t the only ones.

Apps like Lumafusion and Ferrite also allow those working with video and audio to be iPad only as well. They not only are great solutions for using an iPad for videos and podcasts, it can be your main way of editing. The Mac isn’t necessary anymore to make that YouTube Video or create the podcast you always wanted to. It wasn’t that long ago when you needed a high-end iMac or Mac Pro to edit videos to meet the expectations of critics and film reviewers, and most importantly ourselves. You go on YouTube now and look at videos made entirely on the iPad and they are some of the most creative and impressive pieces of art I have seen online in the past 18–24 months. One I highly recommend is that of Serenity Caldwell’s iPad Review.

There are a lot of premium apps with premium prices on the iPad, but not nearly enough for everyone to see that the iPad is a “Mac replacement.” Personally, I think it would be better to see apps like Logic Pro X and Final Cut X get full versions of the apps on iOS. Having Apple tout that the iPad is a great alternative to the Mac and Windows Tablets but not have the premium apps to back it seems counterintuitive to me and I think for people to look at the iPad more than a Facebook and Netflix machine, they hav to put their money where their mouths are.

Despite my criticism on Apple not providing apps that are pro apps, I will say that there is no tablet in the Android, Chromebook, and probably the Windows ecosystem, that is as beautifully designed and well thought out as those on the iOS ecosystem, especially the iPad. If I were to look for something like Affinity Designer and Lumafusion in a Tablet form I sincerely doubt I would find anything that is as close to the intersection of beauty and function like those available on the iPad.

If ever there were a time to think about replacing that old MacBook Air with an iPad, I would say that time is now. With Adobe releasing more iPad apps in 2019 and almost certainly new iPads coming in the next month or two, I think right now is the perfect time to think about what you can do with the iPad and really consider if it can be a replacement for you in your day to day work and life. For me, it absolutely is. I may crack open my Mac once in a while but it by no means is because I need it, it is just that I don’t have the time to learn how to work around those specific things I use my Mac for still. One day I think I will, and probably have an easier time with it thanks to iOS apps like Drafts 5 and Siri Shortcuts to make things as easy as one singular tap.

Pro apps on the iPad are here to stay, and I think having Adobe coming into the game to bring full-featured versions of their apps is a great thing for iOS and the iPad.

Consistency Club

From Consistency Club:

We’re building a high-touch service that helps people track habits and achieve their goals.

Our methodology is built around a belief in the power of external commitment – in other words, you’re more likely to stick to something you’ve shared with another human being than something you’ve punched into an app.

I signed up for this via a Twitter ad (first time for everything I guess). I am very interested to see how this works. If you have $20 and need someone to keep you on track I would say give this a shot.

How to Use Digital Ocean for Web Development on an iPad – the Sweet Setup

🔗 Curtis McHale writing for The Sweet Setup:

While some people have loved the latest editions of MacBook Pro keyboards, others have not. I fall on the side of not liking them at all, which left me with a choice to make with my aging 13” MacBook Air. Do I keep using it or look for alternatives?

After trying Linux and other machines, I turned to my 9.7” iPad Pro wondering if I could do all my work from an iPad. I already had my writing, audio editing, and video workflows nailed down with the iPad, but there was a gap for my web development work.

After some research, I was happy to find that it’s quite possible to do all my web development work on an iPad in almost the exact same way I worked on my MacBook Air. Not only did this give me a much less expensive computer with which I could replace my MacBook Air, it also gave me a much more portable and focused work environment.

Here is how I do web development on my iPad Pro.

Before I thought it wasn’t possible to do this kind of stuff on an iPad, but I’m glad I was wrong.

Honestly, this is impressive. Bravo Curtis.

Getting Caught Up 20: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Episode 20 of Getting Caught Up is finally here after some time away. I am really excited for this one! Mike and I talk about our feelings and criticisms of the book The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson. It has its high points and its low points, so give this a listen if you have also read this book or just want to know our feelings on it to decide if you should buy this book or not.

Shortcut Your Life: Part 1. Do you know where you are? — AngryBunnyMan →

From AngryBunnyMan:

I don’t want to bury the lead so understand that this whole post is all about outsourcing my self-control. it is the next logical step in my evolution towards easy productivity, one influenced by my desire to remove as many decisions from my life as possible.

This method of self-management started many years ago when I decided I choosing clothes to wear every day was more taxing than I really wanted to deal with. And Steve Jobs entere(img)d my life with his sartorial minimalism and the the iPhone in 2007, both of which were revelatory for me.

Fewer decisions means more willpower available at any given time. More willpower means more focus. More focus means more useful work.

This post I found on reddit really solidified my feelings on making my phone less distracting. I’m also a fan of the style this person uses.

Also, I plan to go more in depth once everything is set but here’s what I came up with after reading this article.

 

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