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7 Ways to Deal with Burnout, Stress, and Imposter Syndrome

While I have mentioned it here and there on Twitter, I have been dealing with a lot of things regarding my mental health. Things that I think are common, like Imposter Syndrome, depression, anxiety about money, and stress from my job and from planning a wedding.

These things aren’t new ideas people face, in fact it seems to be about as common as a cold. Plenty of people have had issues with money, careers, and some have planned a wedding too. After thinking about this and writing this post, I have seen some trends regarding “burnout.”

My generation has been told time and time again to go to college, do what makes you happy, and to follow your dreams. That is precisely what I did and I am working in the field I went to school for and I love my job. Yet, I still wake up anxious and afraid of what will come next. This isn’t me blaming anyone for the path I took in my life, I am happy I went to school and I am happy with the career path I took. In fact, I haven’t met someone in the millennial generation that seems to be an outlier from this mental health and cultural issue. This could possibly be just the people I associate with, but even those I talk to have mentioned something like this to me.


In a recent article from The Atlantic Sophie Gilbert mentions Tidying Up With Marie Kondo and how people define success and the burnout many millennials are feeling right now. It also goes into some other things like the Fyre Festival and how these two events are synonymous with the culture that the millennial generation brings. What got me the most, though, was how “burnout” was seemingly connected with success, but what is “burnout” anyway?

The majority of the video content that I consume is on YouTube and a recent trend I have seen by people like Casey Neistat is this open dialog about “burnout.”

In this video he comments on this article from The Insider about big YouTubers feeling burnt out and overwhelmed. Most of this video is about how when people attain this level of success they realize that to continue that growth they have to ultimately push themselves to their absolute breaking point and, frankly, bust their ass to make that effort equal or exceed their expectations.

But what if you haven’t reached that level of success and you already feel burnt out? Does that mean you should just quit while you’re behind? Or does it mean that you need to push yourself even harder to get over that dip?

I ask not just because I want to bring about a different angle on this, but because that is where I am right now. To be completely transparent here, I haven’t seen any real growth from Rocket Panda (formerly Tablet Habit) in several months. It just has this plateau of about 2000 visits a month. Which in blogging terms means next to nothing.

There have been several times where I decide that the best way for me to use my time is to work on a new design, or maybe even move my site to a new blogging platform, or even just change the domain to something else again. Which I know is about has useful as cutting off my foot just before I get ready to run a marathon.

Most of the time I have these thoughts it’s because I am afraid of just sitting down and writing. I am afraid because I worry that once I do I will see I have nothing to say, or what I do have to say isn’t good enough. But as literally every great writer has said in one way or another, the best way to get better at writing is to actually write.

What I am saying here isn’t new and revolutionary. The problems I face aren’t unique by any stretch of the imagination. With that said, I can’t help but feel like this is something that is not being talked about enough, hopefully that will change.

I also find these common problems for my generation to be indicative that millennials are more superficial than ever. For example, I would rather waste time on materialistic things instead of working to get better at my craft. ”If I can’t be the best,” I would say to myself, “why would I want to put any of my time an energy into it? I should just go and try something else that I can be better at instead.”

I don’t know the definitive answer to this problem but I think it starts somewhere with changing the mindsets of myself and others in this era of what success actually is. I am still trying to figure that out for myself, but it shouldn’t be the number in our bank account or whether we have the more organized and optimized apartment.

How I am Changing My Mindset

Before I go into this, I absolutely know that this is something better said than done, but you can’t start somewhere without taking that first step.

1. Throw Envy out the window

One thing I am slowly starting to make a mantra is that your work should be like golf, the only real opponent you should measure yourself to is you.

I have seen people I follow and consider my peers gain success in their own ways and I can’t help be get a little jealous and envious of them for growing while I am not growing fast enough to my liking. This kind of thinking is how you get discouraged and throw in the towel. It isn’t healthy to always be looking how well others are doing and comparing yourself to them. If anything it will drive you insane.

What I plan to do instead is to look at how I am doing month-to-month. The things I want to look at are:

  • RSS subscribers
  • Email Newsletter Subscribers
  • Page Views

With these numbers I record them in a Google Sheet and see how they are trending and see what I need to do to either continue growing, or what I need to do in order to start growing these numbers.

2. Quality of Quantity

While I do want to keep an eye on the numbers, they aren’t everything. One thing that I want to remember as I write and post on Rocket Panda, or really anywhere, is that there are people reading this. My readers are not numbers on a chart, they are human beings that I want to engage with and share things with.

A trick I learned from Chris Wilson was to act like I am writing for a blog or person I admire as if they were to read it. For me it is Federico Viticci, Serenity Caldwell, Myke Hurley, Stephen Hackett, David Sparks, Rose Orchard, Rene Ritchie, Merlin Mann, Alex Cox, Matthew Cassinelli, and John Gruber. All of them are people I admire and hope to connect with one day. Some of whom I already have (listen to the episodes of A Slab of Glass with Rose Orchard, Matthew Cassinelli, Alex Cox, and David Sparks).

If I write something that is for the people I admire I feel like I am more considerate of their time, attention, and I write enough to make my point but I edit down as much as I can to not have too much “fluff.”

3. Focus on the Rocks First

There is an old metaphor about a professor who came into class with an empty jar, he filled it with a few large rocks, then several small pebbles, then sand. The adage goes that you should focus on the big priorities in your life, the big rocks, more and then the other important things, the pebbles, and then the “small stuff” and material things in life, the sand. If you were to focus on the “small stuff” first you wouldn’t be able to fit the rocks and the pebbles in there.

There’s this great video that explains this better than I can.

The point of this, for me at least, is that priorities matter and in order to focus on these big things we first need to acknowledge what those things are. What do we care about the most? Family, friends, passions, careers. These are all good examples. But if we focused more on the small things like the latest tech gadget, whether we have the best phone or iPad, or other material and frivolous things we won’t have the time and energy needed for the big rocks.

Focus on the big rocks first, then the pebbles, and if there is time the sand.

4. Get Organized

In order to find those big rocks, we need to get organized. For me, I have been bouncing around task managers so many times the last week I cared more about what app to write down the things I need to do rather than just doing them.

We all get swept up in the productivity porn of task managers and it can be fun to start using a new app or system; but if we spend all of our time on the app or system we aren’t going to actually get anything done.

So I have decided on an app, which one is honestly not important for this article, and I plan to use this for 90 days without waver. I will write more about it soon but for now I am less interested in writing about the app and actually using it to get things done instead.

I decided to use Things 3, the reason for this is because I have been going back and forth between this and Omnifocus and I decided to use Things 3 after flipping a coin to see which one would win.

Once I take the choice of the app out of the picture I can start focusing on the things that matter, which are the things I want to get done.

5. Replace Social Media Apps on my Home Screen

I am not removing myself from social media, but I am making social media a lower priority for me. When ever I get free time in the bank or at work or even at a stop light I immediately go on my phone and check Twitter.

I have since replaced this with the app Tally to count how many times I open it in a given week.

This prevents me from sinking time into Twitter when I can be doing something better like reading articles on my Pinboard or an actual book. I also deleted Twitter from my phone and instead made it only available as a web app in Safari, which is blocked with 1Blocker. This makes it very much intentional for me to actually open Twitter for something and if I do so I have to jump through a number of hoops to get on it.

Like I said, I am not going away from social media, but I am reducing my intake of it and making it very intentional in my life.

6. Make Time to Get Centered

When I am going through a very anxious or stressful period in my day I spend at least two minutes meditating to get myself back to the center. I know that I am stressed and I know something needs my attention, but if I don’t make the time to decompress this will hit a boiling point that won’t be good for anyone involved.

Meditation is a new thing for me, so I have been using the app Calm to get started on it and learn more about meditation. So far, it seems to be helping me learn and use these meditation techniques at home, work, and even when I write. As of now, I meditate every morning and throughout the day when I feel that things need to be brought back to ground level.

As someone that has a history of depression and anxiety I am blown away with what meditation can do for me. I was a skeptic for a long time but as I get more and more into this space I am finding it to level things out and help subside my depression and anxiety at times.

7. Never Quit Before Reaching the Starting Block

When you are in a creative field, it can be common to have a feedback loop, a recurring thought that you aren’t good enough or that you aren’t doing enough, or something to that affect. I know because this is a very common thing in my writing process.

In fact, it has killed a lot of ideas before they had time to incubate long enough to grow into something. Sometimes it can be good to not spend time on something that you aren’t passionate about. But when your reasoning is because you feel you aren’t good enough that just stops you from even trying out something that could be great.

I have been making a change to my line of thinking with my writing, namely to not kill them off before writing at least 500 words. That way I spend time writing out my thoughts and figuring out what it is I want to say. It has helped me write this very article, and it has allowed me to leave ideas in my writing folder to keep them in the forefront of my brain.

The feedback loops I have are still very much there but I have been working on not letting them make decisions for me.

What’s Next?

With all of these ways I have of dealing with burnout, it is still early on for me. I plan to keep at this and follow up next month. Until then, I would love to know what kinds of things you do to deal with things like burnout, Imposter Syndrome, and feedback loops. You can let me know on Twitter or via email.

My Promise to You

With the new year here I can’t help but also reflect on the things from the past year. I launched Rocket Panda, I posted 24 episodes of A Slab of Glass, and I posted 22 episodes of Getting Caught Up. These are all the things that I am proud of, and the things I want to continue to make over 2019. However, I don’t think I have been doing enough with Rocket Panda, and that stops now.

I was listening to Shawn Blanc’s Creative Focus Summit, where he talked with Paul Jarvis. Paul is a writer and designer and the whole conversation he and Shawn had was about building an audience-based business. He touched on a few things that really got me thinking about what I want to accomplish in 2019 with Rocket Panda.

One thing that really stuck with me was his 3 steps to building an audience that will stick with you, which I can’t believe I just wrote.

His 3-step process is as follows:

  1. Go to where you audience is.
  2. Talk to you audience.
  3. Have a consistent line of communication with them.

I have failed on all 3 of these if you ask me.

Go Where Your Audience Is

I rarely have gone outside of my own blog to find other like-minded people that may enjoy what I have to say. More importantly I haven’t been part of other communities enough and I want to change that. I don’t like the idea of me being on my own island where others have to visit in order to be part of the conversations I want to have.

So from here on I want to spend more time on Twitter and be an active part of the communities I want to be in (Apple, Tech, etc.). I also will be going to places like the Mac Power Users Discord and the Automators Discord and be more active there.

To me, it is more important to share tips and tricks over clicks and links. This is why I will be part of communities more, to bring value without anything in return.

Talk To Your Audience

I haven’t had an open line of communication to my audience much, if at all, since launching Rocket Panda. Everything about this has been a one way conversation and I want that to end.

One thing I want to do is have a direct line of communication to you, my readers, and the way I am doing that is two-fold.

The Newsletter

The first is my newsletter. This is my promise to you:

I will send 25 emails in my newsletter in 2019 that will be full of interesting exclusive content, the ability to ask me questions, and my personal email that you can use to contact me.

This newsletter isn’t about me trying to build a list to sell something. I currently have no plans to do so and if/when I do it won’t be solely to try and sell you something. If I do want to promote something it goes in the newsletter just like everything else I want to send you.

The newsletter will come out twice a month on the 1st and 15th of each month starting January 15th. So sign up today and don’t miss out on the first newsletter.

Slack Channel

The second thing is something I have had for over a year now, which is my Slack channel. This is something I haven’t been active enough in and I want to make this the day-to-day line of communication and community I want to be a part of. This channel is free to join and has a bunch of channels like the iPad-Only club, where people who use only iOS devices can share workflows, Shortcuts, and app recommendations. It also has channels like writers-bloggers where other people who are writers and/or bloggers can network and share ideas/articles for others to read and give feedback on.

These are just a few things that this Slack channel offers and it is something that I will forever continue to add and make changes to upon those who request for more.

If you want to join this Slack channel feel free to sign up here.

Have a Consistent Line of Communication

Along with the 25 emails I promise to send in the newsletter, I also plan to post 2 times a week on Rocket Panda at the very least. That is 104 posts on Rocket Panda! Some will be links, others will be original pieces such as this, and all of it will be completely free and accessible via RSS if you so choose.

My number one goal for 2019 isn’t to make money, or gain a massive following with Rocket Panda. Instead it is to provide a consistent posting schedule and a killer newsletter that helps you get your work done and accomplish your goals in 2019.

On top of the Rocket Panda posts, I will continue to be producing podcasts episodes every other week for both A Slab of Glass and Getting Caught Up. We did this for the most part on both shows. However, the only time we didn’t post episodes on schedule was due to personal events preventing us to do so. Barring anything like that happening again consider it my promise that both of these podcasts will have 26 episodes in 2019.

In Summary

This post has a lot of promises and things for you to check out, so here is a simplified version to make things as easy as possible for you to get what you want and ignore what you don’t.

1. Go where Your audience is

  • I plan to go to places like the Mac Power Users Discord and Automators Discord and be an active member at these awesome communities
  • I also plan to be more active on Twitter as well to share interesting things as well as Shortcuts and tips to help you through the year

2. Talk to Your audience

  • I am launching a newsletter that comes out twice a month beginning January 15th. You can sign up for the newsletter here and get the 25 email I promise to send you throughout the year.
  • I am also making a conscious effort to be more active in my own Slack Channel for other Apple enthusiast to come to meet and talk with other geeks like me. You can join the Slack Channel here

3. Have a consistent line of communication

  • Along with the newsletter I am also going to be posting over 100 articles on Rocket Panda sharing interesting articles other in the community have created as well as original content. It is completely free and you can either visit Rocket Panda’s website or subscribe via RSS.
  • I also will be continuing to post episodes of both A Slab of Glass and Getting Caught Up every other week barring anything happening to prevent this with either myself or my co-hosts Chris Lawley and Mike Rapin.

I am beyond excited to see what 2019 brings and to have the best year I can both personally and professionally.

Until next time I want to wish you a happy new year and well wishes for your plans for 2019 and that you accomplish the goals you set for yourself this year.

Blogging on a Mac Instead of My iPad

Lately I have been using my Mac more and more, and the reason for this is because I find it to have a much easier workflow for my writing than an iPad. This isn’t to say that I can’t do my work on an iPad, I can and I have, but because of apps like MarsEdit and Marked 2 I find that the iPad isn’t my preferred device for writing anymore.

One of my reasons for this are the apps, and how they have improved my workflow when it comes to my writing.

MarsEdit

MarsEdit is probably the go-to application I will tell anyone who is using a WordPress website to use. It has a solid reputation behind it, and it is all apparent after using it for you site. It is built a lot like a standard Mail application with each post being its own item and the data you want to see right there in rows. It allows you to see all your posts easily and select one that might need to be edited or shared.

Once in the editing mode it supports Markdown, HTML, and plain text editing. It is also a really nice Rich Tech editor similar to the WYSIWYG editor WordPress used to have before moving over to Gutenberg. If you want Markdown syntax highlighting, this sadly isn’t the app for you. I spoke with the developer some time ago and I got the feeling that Markdown syntax highlighting isn’t something in the works. I could be wrong about this, and I hope I am, but as of right now there is nothing of the sort in MarsEdit.

Once you are done editing your post, things like the post title, slug, categories, and tags are all available to edit and assign prior to going live. The tags you even have saved on your WordPress website show up when entering them in MarsEdit. You can even use custom fields for things like the Daring Fireball-style Linked List Plugin where you can enter in a custom field with a link and make that URL the hyperlink to your title. You can see a good example of that on my post about the new podcast by Greg Morris called And You Are?.

Finally, this application supports image uploading, meaning that you can insert your image in a post on MarsEdit and when you do hit publish that image is then uploaded to WordPress and attached to the post automatically. This isn’t necessarily anything new as apps like Ulysses also do this. That said, it is a nice touch to not make users have to upload their images and then add them through some kind of library or manually copy the image URLs over.

MarsEdit isn’t just a very nice editing tool for blog posts, it also provides a wonderful array of admin tools as well. For instance, if you want to get the link to a post on your website, you can just select the post and press control+command+C and the link for the post is copied.

Not only that, but with a simple plugin on your browser you can make link-posting on your website a cinch. Simply select the text from an article you want to share, click on the MarsEdit browser plugin and, with the power of the Quick Posts setting in MarsEdit, the link from the site where you selected that text is then formatted however you want for link-posting.

All in all, I think that MarsEdit is a great buy for the price, and if you give it time and really start using it regularly it can be the one and only application you need to post to your blog.

You can buy MarsEdit 4 today for your Mac for $49.95. Which seems high, but if you want a powerful one-stop shop for posting your blog, MarsEdit is by far and away worth the money.

Marked 2

Marked 2 was an app I didn’t think I needed when it came to writing and blogging on the Mac, but once I finally used it I instantly added it to my workflow.

Marked 2 is a simple app on paper, it allows you to open a file with Markdown and see real-time updates to it. Outside of what this does “on paper,” the flourish and polish of this app makes proofreading and quality control smooth and simple.

Along with adding bold text and italics whenever the syntax shows up, it does things like shows the full URL of a link when you hover over it.

It can show the length of selected text with things like world count and character count and sentences in the selection. It allows you to review and check the version your readers will see, making it the last application necessary before hitting publish.

It also has an incredible editing system to show you where you can improve on your writing and grammar. It reminds me a lot of the Hemingway web-app, showing where you write in passive voice, or when you are using words that have preferred alternatives. So instead of saying something is “very large” it could show you something like “enormous” or “gigantic” making for it to be a much more pleasing thing to read.

Finally, Marked 2 also allows you to export the finished product as a slew of different file formats. You can save the finished post as things like a Markdown file, a PDF (paginated and continuous), or even HTML if you want to share it to something like MarsEdit and not have to worry about your WordPress website supporting Markdown formatting.

Marked 2 was the editor I needed when writing as I never feel that my work is worthwhile until I meticulously comb over everything and rewrite draft after draft. Now, with the editing tools and system I can use that as a finish line to when I can stop trying to make it perfect and start making it public.

You can get Marked 2 for $9.99 right now, or become a SetApp subscriber and get access to Marked 2, Ulysses, and a slew of other great apps.

Bringing it All Together

Now that you know both the apps I cherish on the Mac when it comes to my writing, let’s explain the process in my writing and blogging on the Mac.

I first start writing my draft in a text editor. Which is usually Ulysses on the Mac, which can be an alternative to MarsEdit if you just want a text editor that can post to WordPress. One thing I prefer with Ulysses is that it does have Markdown syntax highlighting, allowing me to see more clearly the differences I make when I want to bold or italicize something. However, I am not a fan of how Ulysses handles your posts after you send it off to be posted. It just stays right at the folder you had it in. From there I have to figure out what to do with it. Eventually what I decided to do was make a folder called “Posted” and throw everything I am finished with in there for safe keeping. Once that got cumbersome I decided to make Ulysses my app for writing, and Marked 2 and MarsEdit for editing and publishing respectively.

Anyway, once I am done with my first draft I export the Markdown file of the post to Marked 2 and have both apps side-by-side and make changes to the according to the Keyword Highlight Drawer in Marked 2.

Once done there I send the post to MarsEdit. Once there I add the metadata I need and make sure everything in the post is how I want it. Once I am happy with it I then send it to Rocket Panda for posting.

Conclusion

The workflow is a little crazy seeing that I am using 3 apps to get one post out on to Rocket Panda, but I feel that if I were to exclude any of these in my blogging process it would make for a lesser product.

One thing that I think is something that I prefer over the Mac is just how easy it can be to edit posts and make changes with ease. When it comes to iOS and the WordPress app, which is the only decent app to handle WordPress content on iOS, it is still clunky and ill-fitting to the styling of iOS.

When I am using MarsEdit and Marked 2 on my Mac it feels like it is the perfect way to make sure that my writing is the best that it can be.

Capture – Learning GTD

When it comes to GTD, the first thing you are introduced to is the idea of “Capture.” For the most part it’s straightforward. You can’t store your ideas without getting them out of your head, so you need to have a system in place to make it seamless and second-nature to go from idea to capture.

Without capture you have nothing but a bunch of things swimming in your mind taking up a bunch of space. With this in mind I knew I needed to work on the things that I was going to be using to capture my ideas and tasks. Which starts with what was coming into my life. So I started writing everything out and organizing the different things that come into my life that may require, action.

As you can see, there are a number of different things I use to capture my ideas, and many different types of things I need to capture. Which basically boils down to three categories: digital and analog.

Digital Inputs

For the digital, I wanted to decide on apps to use to capture those things into my task manager of choice. What I needed was a way to send things from each of these sources to my task manager.

Email was the first thing and was simple to configure. A simple Share Sheet option made sending the emails I received to Things 3 a breeze. I also could set up an email account to forward to Things 3, but I preferred a share sheet option as it didn’t require me to have to send an email to myself and clog up my messages.

From there things like Twitter, RSS, text messages, and Overcast, I had to put these ideas and tasks into my system manually. As I use Things 3, I can either use Siri Shortcuts to input something or I could also have a Drafts 5 action in place to send anything I make on a new line to Things. Which isn’t perfect, but it gets the job done without issue.

Finally came my digital notes. This was ultimately the hardest thing to handle as I have been using a combination of Drafts 5 and Bear to handle my notes over the years. When starting from scratch I wanted to take a long hard look at what each of these apps are for, and I eventually decided that Drafts is where everything would start. I decided this because it made things easier for me to decide what I wanted to say and then think about where they go second. Instead of trying to think of whether what I have on my mind is better off in Bear or as an item in Things, I decided to forgo that line of questioning and make Drafts 5 my go-to input app. From there, I can send it to the respective app once I am done capturing my thoughts.

Tim Nahumck made a great point in his Drafts 5 review about this saying:

At its core, Drafts remains the app it has always been: a place where text starts. It is the quintessential app for trusted capture of text. There are other writing/note-taking apps out there that are great in their own right. Some are more suited for long writing and research, while others are good for simple note-taking. But none of them replicate the functionality that Drafts carries on iOS, where integrations built into the app provide powerful, customized actions. This is where the strength of Drafts really shines: it can be the central hub from which everything flows.

Drafts 5 was always an app I loved. Now that I have real guidelines on how I am capturing anything in my digital life it makes Drafts 5 my go-to application for all of my text input.

Analog

Now comes the more difficult area of my life, the analog stuff. There are times where I want to capture things in my Field Notes notebook over Drafts 5. The reasoning could be as simple as I don’t have access to my phone or iPad at that time, or that I want to sketch something out and using my hands is faster than using a keyboard or iPad. In both scenarios I write in my notebook and now have to capture it digitally into my task manager or note-taking app.

Originally I thought scanning my notes and saving them in Bear would be sufficient, but after a few tries with that it made searching a pain. So now I make it a point at the end of each day to go through my notebook and decide what stuff I want to digitize in Drafts what things I don’t. This is technically part of the processing section of GTD but as I see it moving things to one cohesive system is so important I have to make it a habit I never break. For me, i consider it more a capturing process over actual processing as I am just throwing these items in my “Inbox” of Things 3 and deciding what to do with it later.

While my notebook and my digital input covers 95% of my life, there are still instances where snail mail and other paper documents appear and I need to find a way to handle them in my GTD system. Which leads me to one of the most important things I have learned in GTD: having an “In” box at your desk.

I take these paper documents and keep them in my “In” basket by my desk and make it a point at the end of my day to, along with looking over my Field Notes, go through and add these documents to either my reference material (Bear) or my task manager (Things 3). Again, this is technically processing but I think it is still worthy of mention here before I really dive deep into the processing section of GTD.

Conclusion

In short, I think doing this project allowed me to not only get a handle on what things I have coming at me at a regular basis that requires my attention, but I also now have formed a better understanding of how to manage them all in one trusted system. Which, if you ask me, is the hardest part of this whole GTD process.

So now that I know what I need to do for every kind of input in my life and what apps and workflows I need to accomplish them, the next thing I want to cover is processing, which will come next in this series.

Until then, feel free to share with me how you capture your tasks and ideas on twitter. I would love to hear your workflows!

Tablet Habit is now Rocket Panda

As of today Tablet Habit is now Rocket Panda. Before I go into the full reasoning why I wanted to share with you what has been going on with me for the last few weeks.

To make a long story short, I have been having a bit of an issue defining my blog. As I have said before, Tablet Habit was a blog for me to explain how I use the iPad as my main device and it was a way for me to express my love for iOS and the iPad. That all changed once I started using my 2017 MacBook Pro.

I started to slowly move more and more things to my Mac and less work on my iPad. Which brought on something of an identity crisis. I gained readers because I was an “iPad guy” and drifting away from that seems like I was cheating my readers out of what they wanted.

My first idea was to move things from Tablet Habit over to Mac Habit.

Logo for Mac Habit I made

Logo for Mac Habit I made

After a lot of work building a new website from scratch and importing all of my old posts over, Mac Habit was inches away from taking over Tablet Habit. I was excited, nervous, and anxious to show everyone the new website I was going to be using. But then a question popped in my head.

“What makes Mac Habit any different than Tablet Habit?”

The original answer I had was Mac was a more universal term for Apple blogging, and it was something that wasn’t tied to anything other than Apple. It wasn’t a device-specific name like Tablet Habit. Which sounded fine, but I wanted something even more freeing than Tablet or Mac as my name.

I spent days, even weeks, trying to come up with a new name. Then, during a shower I was taking the name Rocket Panda came to my head and I loved it. It wasn’t specific to any kind of topic or idea, and the name stuck with me like glue. If you ask me what it means, I will say it is just a cool name that I enjoy, and that Rocket Panda doesn’t need a topic or underlying meaning. It is just something that is catchy and easy to pronounce and type out without any kind of mispronouncing or misspelling. In short, I like the name way more then Tablet Habit or Mac Habit.

Seeing as this is my blog, and has always been a personal endeavor for me, having a name that isn’t tied to a specific topic seemed to be the right choice.

This website will still have all the things you loved about Tablet Habit, including all the old posts. The only change you will notice about this site is that it has a new name and a new color scheme to match the flames coming from the Rocket Panda logo. I may deviate from posts about Apple, but this is and forever will be a personal blog where I share my thoughts on things. It will always have my authenticity in it and I like to think people read my stuff because of my personality I put to the page, not the topics that I write about.

If you want to follow Rocket Panda on social media or make sure you have the right RSS feed subscription you can find all the links below. If you have any questions, comments, concerns feel free to mention Rocket Panda on Twitter or email me directly.

I thank all of you for being loyal readers and sticking with me over the last year with Tablet Habit. Here’s to many more with Rocket Panda!

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Learning GTD: Starting From Scratch

When I started reading Getting Things Done, I was in a spinning world of chaos. I had many different plates spinning at the same time and no way of making sure that nothing fell through the cracks. I needed a system.

So, as a challenge to both my co-host of A Slab of Glass, Christopher Lawley, and myself I set out to read the book Getting Things Done by David Allen cover to cover to see just if GTD was something that would work for me. After chapter one I was all in.

I wanted to use this methodology immediately. I did brain dumps, set up a task manager, and started making boat loads of contexts and tags and folders. I thought I was finally getting to where I wanted with a system that worked for me. The reality was that I was on a high setting up all these productivity things, and I was no closer to getting my work done.

If I am being honest, I was even further from getting the big things in my life done. I did all the things I thought I needed to do to get my life in order and start Getting Things Done, but in reality I just took the foundation of the methodology and ran with it, without thinking on a much higher level.

I was worried about having a task manager that handled everything I threw at it, without actually throwing anything at it. I put the cart before the horse, and that is where I think a lot of people end up when starting a brand new productivity system. This all stops now for me.

I have decided that over the next several weeks I will be starting from scratch in Getting Things Done, and do what David Sparks suggested when he was on A Slab of Glass episode 19:

Do not try to create an entire system in a day. I think what you should do is you should make a list of things you want to improve. What are the key elements of a task management system? There’s capture, how do you capture tasks? How do you process tasks? How do you complete tasks? How do you review projects? Those are the big 4 steps. And pick one of those and say, “How am I going to get better at this?” And do that for two weeks, or a month, or two months, or whatever it takes to just internalize that and say, “Okay, I am just crushing it on capture, now how am I going to process tasks?” If you try to do it all at once it’s just overwhelming and nothing sticks. It’s just like learning keyboard shortcuts or anything you do. Bite off small pieces and fully digest them. And then take another piece, but don’t try to eat the whole elephant in one bite, you’re going to have a problem.

So the first thing I am going to work on is capturing. I need to figure out a system that will work for me and what will allow me to make capturing thoughts, ideas, projects, tasks, and anything else that comes to mind. I need to make it second nature to take those ideas in my mind and put them somewhere I will go back to later to process them.

All of this will be part of an ongoing series on Tablet Habit I like to call “Learning GTD.” Capturing will be part one of this new series, and I can’t wait to share this journey with all of you as I try to make my life more organized and less chaotic.

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